Why Developers Make Really Bad Tech Writers

 

coding-future

Every now and then, I come across a blog post or other article or column declaring that technical writing for software development is a dying career, lamenting that all of us in the tech writing game should plan our exit strategies and admit that if a product is truly well-designed, our services are simply not needed.

Surely, in some product cases this is true. However, in many high-level software instances, I defy you to successfully install and run the product without some help from your friendly neighborhood tech writer. I pose this challenge because developers think and behave like developers and users think and behave like users. There is a chasm as wide as the English Channel between developer and user, and only the talented technical writer can provide transport safely across.

It’s not that developers are incapable of writing well or that they cannot write documentation, and it is not that users cannot ferret their way through intricate software. Developers could write supporting documentation – IF they weren’t developing that particular product. But alas, developers are too close to the products they are developing. They lack adequate perspective when it comes to their fledgling software, and they have great difficulty seeing it from a user’s point of view. The software, to a developer, makes sense. Developers arrive at a use-stance with some assumptions about functionality and behavior already in hand. So they make lousy content writers because they can’t see it from a user standpoint.

A shift needs to occur in order to artfully create usable content. A developer’s view is, “this is the product, and here are its amazing features,” whereas a technical writer will approach the very same thing from a perch saying, “here is how to do some amazing stuff with this new product.”

Technical writing shifts the focus to a user-centric view that is very difficult for a developer to take. It’s also no small thing that technical writers have been trying to master language, grammar and syntax for the better part of their educations. It’s a sure bet that developers have taken English courses as part of their college education. There are no programmers out there who are illiterate, don’t get me wrong. I work with some really smart people, no doubt about it! But when I tell them that all of our documentation is better perceived in active voice rather than passive, I tend to get a room filled with glassy-eyed folks who really want to get back to their work creating dynamic rules instead of determining whether or not they need a helping verb.

Technical writing in the software field is far from dying. What it IS doing is merging – tightly – with user interaction. It is absolutely, inarguably true that users wish they did not have to read so much in order to get started when they have a new product in their hands. So when we design documentation, we had better design it to work well. Lean documentation is essential – Strunk and White and their mantra “omit needless words” were not kidding.

Working with developers is an art. Letting them do what they do best, and making way for what writers do best, is a science.

I’ve argued more than once that mastering a given tool, like Dita or Framemaker, is fruitful but only if the situation calls for it. I have a totally separate set of tools that I use in my job, and they may or may not prove to be portable, but the skill that is 100% portable is that I can talk to, work with, communicate with, and understand – developers. I let them do their jobs with great enthusiasm, and I encourage them to let me do mine. It’s a synergy that keeps us all smiling, and pushing software out the door at a high rate of success. I work on UX, I design good doc, I focus on usability, I listen to my data.  I look at those sills that simply crackle with career stability. I let the developers tell me everything else that is important. And…I don’t make them write too much. Why? Because they don’t really enjoy it anyway.

And developers make really bad tech writers.

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One thought on “Why Developers Make Really Bad Tech Writers

  1. Agree 100%. Now if only today’s software development managers would agree — as I watch misunderstandings of Agile methodology revert skill specialization into scrums of equal can-do’s, and well-meant team participation warped into notions that career-built capabilities are easily interchangeable.

    Liked by 1 person

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